Julies Blog

Why the Cleaning industry is a good investment

by Julie Finch-Scally

Having worked in the cleaning industry for the past twenty years, and written books and articles on the subject, I feel I am in a position to be a judge as to whether money can be made from cleaning.

My father used to say “There’s money in dirt”. I know he was right because over the years, all the people I have met who do cleaning are never short of money. No, they are not the wealthiest people, but they always have enough money to pay their bills and give them a comfortable life style.

The cleaning industry is extensive. It is not just cleaning people’s properties, it includes commercial cleaning, window cleaning, pool cleaning, any sort of area where the object needs to be cleaned on a regular basis.

It is the fact that cleaning is done regularly that makes the money. The cleaning industry is on par with supermarkets. Everyone needs to regularly buy food to live. Many people need to have their home, their pool their windows cleaned on a regular basis.

If you own a dress shop or a hardware store, to make money you are dependent upon the number of people you can attract into your premises to buy your product. With the supermarket and the cleaning industry you just need to offer a better service than your competitors. Everyone who works in the Supermarket and Cleaning industry makes money. Some make more than others and it is the service they offer that attracts them more clients.

Supermarkets, because of the amount of food they sell, grow with the increase of the population. They have become so large they are listed on the stock exchange and have shareholders who receive a dividend from the profits generated.

This could be the case with the cleaning industry but at the moment it is an unrealized potential. As the population ages and more and more people in the Western world work longer hours with less leisure time, outsourcing of cleaning is becoming the way of life.

No commercial or residential cleaning company as yet has become large enough to offer shares in their company, but many have gone into franchising. They have found that having replicas of themselves is a lucrative way for many people, including the founder of the organisation, to make money.

But there is no reason why the cleaning industry should not be a large corporation with shareholder. If the entrepreneurs many years ago could see the potential for the sale of food in supermarkets, surely it is time for the entrepreneurs to see the potential in the cleaning industry. The small companies are there doing the work. Maybe it is time they started joining forces and established one greater cleaning company, with excellent service, for both commercial and residential customers’ needs.

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

‘Preparing your House for Sale

 

will take you from ‘decision’ to ‘moving’

 

find out how to purchase from

the ‘Cleaning Books’ section

 

 

Cleaning an extractor fan

by Julie Finch-Scally

Before we moved the other week I had to clean the extractor fan in the bathroom. I had noticed dust in the cover for quite some months and been annoyed because it looked bad, but I didn’t realise how bad until I took the fan apart.

For years I have been telling everyone about dust generated everytime we use a towel after a shower; but it must be doubly so with an extractor fan. Not only does the condensation make the dust stick, but static electricity build up by the rotation of the blades attracts the dust.

I had to use a ladder to reach the fan so I could remove the cover. I took that into the laundry to soak in a tub of soapy water and scrubbed it with a dishwashing brush. The colour of the water, once I’d finished, was black. But that section of the fan was nothing compared to the dust sticking on the flaps which stop air being blown back into the room. After some investigation I found out how to clip out the frame that held the flaps and took that section to the laundry.

Removing the flaps revealed dust sticking to the fan blades and the tube in which it is housed. The dust in the tube and on the blades was quite disgusting: at least three to four millimeters thick. I couldn’t believe it. I’ve been into many homes and seen dust but this was similar to the fluff that sits in the air vent of clothes driers.

I couldn’t remove the fan so to clean the tube was difficult. A damp cloth took the skin of dust away but left a dirty mark. This meant I had to wash down the tube and fan with a sponge and some soapy water, than wipe over the affected areas with a dry cloth.   I must say when I had finished you could have eaten your dinner off the fan and the tube it was so clean.

Wouldn’t you know it, while I was washing the flaps they came out of the frame which meant I had to re-assemble the whole thing before replacing it. Thankfully the cover was easy to put back just a twist and it was sitting in its usual position.

When the job was finished I was proud of myself. The extractor fan in my bathroom looked pristine and clean. I hope the new owners don’t leave it as long as I did before they clean it again.

 

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

‘Preparing your House for Sale

 

will take you from ‘decision’ to ‘moving’

 

find out how to purchase from

the ‘Cleaning Books’ section

 

 
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