Julies Blog

Disinfectant in Cleansers

by Julie Finch-Scally

There has been promotion recently for cleansers and liquid soap containing disinfectant. The adverts are aimed at Mums to help keep their children safe from all diseases.

I can understand Mums looking at this advertising and thinking the product must be good; we all want to keep our children safe. But do these products come with a guarantee that this will be the case? I don’t believe so.

Every child should be taught to wash their hands after using the bathroom and prior to eating, and then it wouldn’t be necessary for children to be constantly subjected to disinfectant.

Disinfectant kills germs. That is why they’re used in hospitals where there is more infection. But in a home, providing there is a regular regime of keeping the house clean; it is very unlikely a child will catch some devastating disease. Children who do pick up dangerous viruses have come in contact with a carrier outside their home. If a child’s hands were cleaned when they left the playground or after playing with other children, there would be less chance of contagion.

From the time they are born children put things in their mouth. Children have been known to eat dirt and never have bad reactions to the experience. Actually a doctor will tell you, children playing in dirt and mixing with other children helps them build up immunity to germs and diseases. Many doctors think it is good for children to get such diseases as measles and mumps when they are young, because to get them when they are an adult is dangerous.

Constantly cleaning a house with disinfectant doesn’t remove germs that will kill you, it removes every bacteria, some of which can be helpful and increase your and your child’s immunity.

Since I started working in the cleaning industry I wash my hands a lot more. I make a point of coming home from every excursion; and that could include visiting a friend or doing the shopping; and going straight to the bathroom to thoroughly wash my hands. Not with disinfectant, but with soap and water. Any germs I have touched while outside are removed and my hands are clean.

If all of us washed our hands more often with soap and water we would have less concerns about coming down with a devastating disease. Let’s leave the disinfectant for the cuts and abrasions that need it.

 

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

‘Preparing your House for Sale

 

will take you from ‘decision’ to ‘moving’

 

find out how to purchase from

the ‘Cleaning Books’ section

 

 

COMPUTERS & DUST

By Julie Finch Scally

There are very few homes that don’t have a computer. They sit on desks and floors and are great dust collectors. Because they are run with electricity they generate a lot of static electricity which attracts the dust. But unlike the typewriter of yesteryears, computers don’t come with a cover to protect the key board and the monitor, so a regular dust is necessary. Some companies employ people to do this work but the home PC should be cleaned just as regularly.

Because of electricity computers cannot be cleaned with damp cloths, neither can the equipment be sprayed with any form of liquid. But using a dry cloth over everything still doesn’t remove the dust. So what is the best way to get the key board clean and the finger prints off the monitor screen?

Before you start cleaning any part of the computer turn it off. That way if a button or a key gets pressed it won’t affect the workings. With the key board firstly turn it upside down and shaking it, there are gaps between the keys and dust falls down in between onto the electronics. Hopefully the shaking will dislodge the dust and it will fall out. To remove the dust from the keyboard itself hold the board up on its side and with a small paint brush dust in between all the keys.

If you have a plasma monitor cloths can’t be used on the screen. Try brushing lightly with the dry paint brush. For the glass screen monitor, spray some glass cleanser on a micro-fibre cloth and wipe it over the screen. Give the screen a side on glance to see if all the marks have been removed. The rest of the monitor should be wiped over with a dry cloth.

The computer it self needs to be wiped over, especially the top where you can use a cloth, but all the little indentations and crevices need to be brushed out with the paint brush. Be careful not to flick the brush as it only puts the dust into the air and doesn’t let it drop down onto the floor where it can be easily vacuumed away.

Remember your computer should be cleaned at least fortnightly. By then you will be able to see the dust.

 

 

Are you or someone you know thinking of selling their property?

 

Julie Finch-Scally

The Guru of Cleaning®

can show you how

 

In Ebook format the two books

 

‘Preparing your Apartment for Sale

and

‘Preparing your House for Sale

 

will take you from ‘decision’ to ‘moving’

 

find out how to purchase from

the ‘Cleaning Books’ section

 

 
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